This is a site dedicated to the Libertines and their offspring. News, interviews, reviews, articles, pictures, videos and exclusives right here from the troubled world of the Babyshambles and Dirty Pretty Things (and, why not, Yeti).

11/17/2008

DPT in Scandinavia

Photo by Robby


I get along from Copenhagen.

Review of the Stockholm gig. Translation by Martina:
"Nothing could be as devastating to a rockband as when the scandals become more important than the music. Nothing, except perhaps living in the shadow of a former sensations band, one of which you used to be a member of. Carl Barat was one of the two singer and songwriters in the drug-serie, the Libertines. When his new band Dirty Pretty Things announced in October that they would go separate ways, for the benefit of future project it is hard not to interpret that as result of the inability to live up to a forced reputation.More songs than “Bang, Bang, you’re dead” seem to be about previous band colleague Peter Doherty rather then old girlfriends. Yet Dirty Pretty Things feels obliged to end the show with the Libertines song “I get along”- although it feels far away from being necessary in the context. Even if Carl Barat’s songs may seem a little dry in melody on record, they are the more efficient on stage. An amplifier has been covered with the Union Jack and there are moments of punkish mods-pop, when DPT really feels like a pure British band. As when rocky “Chinese dog” smoothly glides into the backbeat epos of “The Country Grove”. Other times they come across more as a British “The Strokes.But just as the garage rock seem to be on autopilot the band once again changes the beat or pushes the tempo of the song “The Enemy” too madness. With the band interaction and everlasting energy you will haft to remember that this is a farewell-tour".
Review of the Copenhagen gig by Cicia from carlbarat.com, who witnessed a curious episode:
"The hour long wait between the support band and DPT wasn't so great, but the gig was. The band were all smiling and laughing a lot. The sound was a bit strange, but I believe that's cause the amps were placed a bit strange in front of the stage. I couldn't hear much of the singing except for Didz. Not complaining! There weren't any big surprises in the set list, but they did end with You fucking love it, and then I get along, which was a nice surprise as I wasn't sure we'd get that one. Another nice surprise was they did not play Tired of England, as I quite expected since that was released as a single and they're not THAT huge over here. During one song, when singing into the same mic, Carl licked Didz's nose. In the end of one of the last songs he dowsed Didz in beer. The band seemed to have a good time and so did we. It was a fantastic gig".

3 comments:

Amanda said...

I speak swedish, want a translation?

EZ said...

Yes please!!

Martina said...

Okay, so here it is. It is far away from perfect and i am uncertain about some parts, if it sounds right or not but hopefully you'll get the overall message.

Dirty Pretty Things @ Debaser Medis, Stockholm

Nothing could be as devastating to a rockband as when the scandals become more important than the music. Nothing, except perhaps living in the shadow of a former sensations band, one of which you used to be a member of. Carl Barat was one of the two singer and songwriters in the drug-serie, the Libertines. When his new band Dirty Pretty Things announced in October that they would go separate ways, for the benefit of future project it is hard not to interpret that as result of the inability to live up to a forced reputation.

More songs than “Bang, Bang, you’re dead” seem to be about previous band colleague Peter Doherty rather then old girlfriends. Yet Dirty Pretty Things feels obliged to end the show with the Libertines song “I get along”- although it feels far away from being necessary in the context. Even if Carl Barat’s songs may seem a little dry in melody on record, they are the more efficient on stage.

An amplifier has been covered with the Union Jack and there are moments of punkish mods-pop, when DPT really feels like a pure British band. As when rocky “Chinese dog” smoothly glides into the backbeat epos of “The Country Grove”. Other times they come across more as a British “The Strokes.

But just as the garage rock seem to be on autopilot the band once again changes the beat or pushes the tempo of the song “The Enemy” too madness. With the band interaction and everlasting energy you will haft to remember that this is a farewell-tour.